How to become an Environmental Consultant

How to become an Environmental Consultant

Environmental consulting is also increasingly in demand to develop policies and procedures that help companies run their business in environmentally-conscious ways, so as to develop a strong 'green friendly' brand and The largest job growth in the industry will be in the private sector, but there will also be a demand for qualified environmental scientists in the public sector. Environmental Consultant Job Duties include: Identifying any site contamination by conducting site assessments Identifying potential sources of contamination that can have adverse impacts on the immediate and wider environment Conferring with clients, regulators and sub-contractors Using software-modelling to project pollution outputs under various different conditions Preparing detailed scientific reports that can be easily understood by the general public Maintaining current knowledge of pertinent legislation and how it can potentially impact clients Educational Requirements To become an environmental consultant, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in environmental science, environmental studies, geology, environmental engineering, or a closely related field is typically the minimum requirement.  Additional skills in communications and business management can also be very helpful. A master’s degree isn’t necessary for getting an entry-level job with an environmental consulting firm, but employers will often give preference to candidates who have earned a graduate degree.

Environmental law, new development, mining and vegetative regeneration are the main drivers of Environmental jobs. There are a large number of firms offering environmental consulting services, and quite a few of the smaller ones focus their work in particular sectors like mining, agriculture and farming, contaminated land management or infrastructure development.  Others specialise in specific services, such as environmental impact assessment or audit, across all industries. The bigger consultancies have more often than not grown out of firms that originally made their names in areas waste management, civil engineering or water and sewage. Customers and employers of environmental consultants include local authorities, central governments, non-governmental and wildlife organisations and conservation organizations. In the longer term, employment prospects for environmental consultants are likely to expand in developing economies in regions like India, China and South America. The strongest growth areas in consultancy are forecast to be climate change/emissions management and waste management and sustainability, followed closely by environmental impact assessment and contaminated land. Environmental Consultant Salary The salary level of environmental consultants can vary greatly depending on your level of education, experience, your niche of expertise and where you work, but at the time of writing, a reasonable expectation is between $75,000 to 150,000, depending on your experience and seniority.

The Role Environmental Consultants play in Supporting Air Quality

Among other things, this involves assessing the performance of businesses in achieving environmental approvals, and managing their ongoing operations and compliance with regulations designed to keep workers and the community safe from air pollutants. Atmospheric scientist with experience in air quality consulting, odour measurement, dust and odour impact assessments understand the key air quality issues faced by businesses and how best to provide solutions that meet the expectations of environmental regulators and the community. This can require the monitoring of air quality and odour in the workplace, gas sample laboratory analyses including soil vapour assessments; meteorological monitoring, modelling and data analysis; air and odour dispersion modelling and impact assessment; the assessment of regional climate and its variability; and the clear and concise reporting and communication of complex ideas and outcomes, to all stakeholders. An example of this kind of work in action is shown in the video below, where Melbourne based environmental consulting company Atma Environmental demonstrate the application of soil vapour testing, to measure the seeping of volatile contaminants present in soil or groundwater, into the atmosphere, which can be particularly dangerous in buildings and enclosed spaces. If these toxic chemicals are not identified and people get prolonged exposure to them, they can lead to chronic health problems or terminal illnesses.

Geotechnical Engineering and Structural Foundations

All manner of infrastructure, including houses, high rise office towers, roads, bridges, dams and tunnels need their proposed site, and sometimes the surrounding areas, to be analyzed to ensure their construction plans meet required engineering standards. The foundations of any piece of infrastructure transmit the weight bearing load from the structure to the earth. As you can imagine, it is critical that the foundations are strong enough to hold the weight of the building, even under irregular conditions like flood and earthquakes. The primary considerations for foundation support are bearing capacity, settlement, and ground movement beneath the foundations. Bearing capacity is the ability of the site soils to support the loads imposed by buildings or structures. Geotechnical Engineers Geotechnical Engineers are the people who analyse the geotechnical conditions on a site and the way they will interact with a building, to determine the structural engineering requirements of construction projects. Geotechnical engineers a design the foundations of structures based on the load characteristics of the structure and the properties of the soils and/or bedrock on the site. They are responsible for ensuring that the structural foundations are within prescribed engineering tolerances. To do this they take soil and rock samples, analyse these, and when they have completed their analysis, write reports that provide advice to civil and structural engineers, architects, construction personnel and landscapers on the most appropriate methods and materials to use when undertaking construction in an area.
Contaminated Land Consulting

Contaminated Land Consulting

One particular niche of environmental consulting is Contaminated Land Management. A specialised contaminated land management consultant is required when property is rezoned from a commercial zone to a residential zone, or if a request has been made to remove land from the Contaminated Sites Register. Contaminated Land Consultants are often required required by property developers when they are buying (or selling) land suitable for commercial or residential development. For property owners and land developers, the most important thing to understand about purchasing land that is potentially contaminated is the risks involved. Frtom a legal standpoint, land owners are responsible for the remediation of contamination on their land. For this reason, it’s essential to investigate a property’s contamination status prior to purchase, to avoid purchasing expensive environmental liabilities along with the land. The primary service an environmental consultant specialising in contaminated land provides is site contamination reports. These reports determine the risk of or the extent of contamination on a site. This is often referred to as a Preliminary Site Investigation (PSI), or a Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment. A PSI will identify the likelihood of, plus and any potential sources of contamination, the location of potential contamination, any potentially affected media (soil, groundwater, etc) and any human and ecological receptors.
Why Australia Needs National Legislation to Regulate Ecological & Environmental Consultants.

Why Australia Needs National Legislation to Regulate Ecological & Environmental Consultants.

We need to regulate environmental consultants at all level of government where such consultants are relied upon to give authorities advice about the effects of development and other projects. We need to ensure consultants are competent and ethical, and we need the ability to sanction them and ultimately ban them for repeated and/or serious offences. Let’s get some faith restored in the assessment process for the protection of a Australians. I am also an environmental consultant who wants to be able to report what I see rather than being lent on by clients to 'turn a blind eye', and threatened with non-payment if I ignore my duty to report without prejudice.

What’s the Difference between Environmental and Ecological Consulting?

What’s the Difference between Environmental and Ecological Consulting?

Ecological and environmental consulting are closely related disciplines. The main difference between the two is that the Environmental Consulting is a more overarching field that incorporates many elements of Earth and life sciences, to understand various natural processes.  Ecology, on the other hand, is usually more focused on how organisms interact with each other and with their immediate surroundings. An important difference between ecology and environmental science is the goal of research in each discipline. Unlike environmental scientists, ecologists tend to focus their research on very specific populations of living things, such as a certain type of grass or a group of fishes. Ecologists seek to understand how populations interact, reproduce, and thrive within an ecosystem. They concentrate mainly on immediate factors such as food preferences, predation, and sexual selection within a group. Through careful observation and historical research, they explain the developmental and evolutionary adaptations that influence a species and their work is particularly important where development may threaten a species habitat, particularly if the species is rare or endangered. Environmental scientists conduct field and laboratory studies to learn about a range of factors that influence an area. Like ecologists, they study living things and their behaviour’s in detail. In addition, they consider the impacts of climate, geological processes, temperature changes, and water cycles on sites and ecosystems.